Impressionist George Oberteuffer: His Life and Work in France and America

Impressionist George Oberteuffer: His Life and Work in France and America

$34.00

Impressionist George Oberteuffer His Life and Work in France and America features more than 100 vibrant color plates of the artist’s work. An engaging biographical and critical essay by art historian Kathleen Kienholz accompanies his paintings of city, country and coastal scenes in Europe and America. The oils, watercolors, drawings, and etchings reproduced in the book were obtained through the generosity of many donors including the Phillips Collection, the Brooklyn Museum, the National Academy of Design, and other museums and individuals. An appendix lists the titles and other information of more than 170 additional works by George Oberteuffer from exhibition catalogues, public sales, and Internet sites. The essay follows his life from his native Philadelphia (1878-1905) to France (1905-1919) and his return to the United States(1919-1940) where he taught and painted in Chicago, New York, Memphis, and art colonies in the Midwest and New England coast. The Foreword by independent art historian Dr. Carol Lowrey refers to George Oberteuffer as a “gifted painter” whose “career needed to be documented and his work put into perspective, especially in relation to the tradition of American Impressionism. Kathleen Kienholz has done just that…” A student of Thomas Anshutz and William Merritt Chase, George Oberteuffer was recognized in his lifetime for his originality and skill in capturing a sense of place in monumental city structures, country landscapes, quiet gardens in bloom, or busy harbors. His versatility is further evident in his sensitive portraits of family members and others. Except for short biographies and examples of his art in exhibition catalogues, very little information about him and his life has been available. This volume offers the art community and the many owners of George Oberteuffer’s paintings a greater knowledge of his work and an opportunity to compare him with his contemporaries in the art world of the early 20th century.